Contributors

Meet the people responsible for adding this collection to the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives.

Directors

Photo of Margaret Conrad

Margaret Conrad is an Honorary Research Professor in History at the University of New Brunswick. She is co-director of the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives project.

Photo of Erik Moore

Erik Moore is Director of the Electronic Text Centre at UNB Libraries and co-director of the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives project.

Consultants

Photo of Stephen Davidson

A contributor to the Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Stephen Davidson has been an elementary school teacher for over 25 years. His current assignment is at Hillside Park School in Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia. Besides a young adult novel and a history of a loyalist family, Davidson has written articles for such diverse publications as The Beaver Magazine, Generations, The Loyalist Gazette, and R.E.A.L., The Canadian Kids Magazine.

Professor Emeritus Willis D. Hamilton was one of the founders and the first director of UNB’s Mi’kmaq-Maliseet Institute (1981-1992). He is the author of Indian Lands in New Brunswick: The Case of the Little South West Reserve (Acadiensis, Spring 1984) and many other articles and books, including The Julian Tribe, Old North Esk on the Miramichi, The Dictionary of Miramichi Biography, and a number of sketches of aboriginal and non-aboriginal figures in The Dictionary of Canadian Biography. In 2008, he established the annual Miramichi Historians’ Prize in the UNB Department of History.

Photo of Micah Pawling

Micah Pawling received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Maine at Orono. The title of his dissertation is “Petitions and the Reconfiguration of Homeland: Persistence and Tradition Among Wabanaki Peoples in the Nineteenth Century.” His cross-border work examines why the Penobscots, Passamaquoddies, and Maliseets adopted the practice of submitting written requests or petitions to government officials in Maine, New Brunswick, and Quebec. Wabanaki peoples, through the use of petitions, attempted to wield their influence in the new geo-political realities of an international border across their homeland.

Micah has worked with the Penobscot Indian Nation on a book project entitled Wabanaki Homeland and the New State of Maine: The 1820 Journal and Plans of Survey by Joseph Treat (University of Massachusetts Press, 2007). At the University of Maine, he has taught United States History, Maine Studies, and Native Studies. A Maine legislative sentiment recognized Micah’s collaboration with Wabanaki communities in the state.

Photo of John Reid

John Reid is a member of the History department at Saint Mary’s University. His research has focused on early modern northeastern North America and the history of higher education. Reid’s most recent books include The ‘Conquest’ of Acadia, 1710: Imperial, Colonial, and Aboriginal Constructions (with five coauthors, 2004), Viola Florence Barnes, 1885-1979: A Historian’s Biography (2005), and Essays on Northeastern North America, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (2008). He has also published two historical novels for teenage readers and a short history of Nova Scotia.

Photo of Martha Walls

Martha Walls received her PhD from the University of New Brunswick and has taught Canadian and First Nations history at UNB and St. Francis Xavier University. Her research is focused on twentieth century Canadian Indian policy and its impact on Maritime First Nations. Her publications include articles for the journals Acadiensis and the Canadian Journal of Native Studies and a monograph, No Need of a Chief for this Band: The Maritime Mi’kmaq and Federal Electoral Legislation, 1899-1951 (UBC, Spring 2010).

Administration

Photo of Kelly Chaves

Kelly Chaves is a Ph.D. student at the University of New Brunswick, studying Native North Americans in the British Navy and Merchant service from 1700-1776. For this project, she researched, wrote for the website, and organized various meetings and events.

Photo of Natalie Dubé

Natalie Dubé is Office Manager of the Electronic Text Centre at the University of New Brunswick. She manages the project's administrative requirements.

Research, Transcription, and Encoding

Photo of David Bent

David Bent is a Ph.D. candidate in Canadian History at the University of New Brunswick, supervised by Dr. Margaret Conrad. His work focuses on rural and agricultural history in twentieth century Nova Scotia. He works for the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives as an encoder, transcriber, and researcher.

Photo of Kelly Chaves

Kelly Chaves is a Ph.D. student at the University of New Brunswick, studying Native North Americans in the British Navy and Merchant service from 1700-1776. For this project, she researched, wrote for the website, and organized various meetings and events.

Photo of Kristin Crandall

Kristin Crandall is an undergraduate student at the University of New Brunswick honouring in World Literature and Culture Studies. She performs text encoding, proofreading, and metadata creation for the project.

Photo of Koral LaVorgna

Koral LaVorgna is a Ph.D. candidate in Canadian History at the University of New Brunswick, studying nineteenth-century New Brunswick teacher careerism. She works as a heritage consultant, researching Fredericton’s hidden history. For this project, she served as transcriber and proofread document transcriptions before designing the board game, Contested Terrain: Petition Edition.

Photo of Sharon Leighton

Sharon Leighton is an MA student at the University of New Brunswick, where she is studying history. She contributed to project research and proofread document transcriptions for this digital collection.

Photo of Karen Stote

Karen Stote is a PhD student in the Interdisciplinary Studies Program at the University of New Brunswick. Her work focuses on the sterilization of Aboriginal women in Canada. She contributed to project research, metadata creation, and text encoding.

Photo of Vivian Unger

Vivian Unger holds a B.A. in Classics and Computer Science from McGill University. Her fiction has appeared in e-zines and the anthology Twisted Tails V. She helps to manage online content for the Contested Terrain project and performs cross-browser testing to ensure this website is accessible to users of a wide range of web browsers and operating systems.

Content Authors

Photo of David Bent

David Bent is a Ph.D. candidate in Canadian History at the University of New Brunswick, supervised by Dr. Margaret Conrad. His work focuses on rural and agricultural history in twentieth century Nova Scotia. He works for the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives as an encoder, transcriber, and researcher.

Photo of Kelly Chaves

Kelly Chaves is a Ph.D. student at the University of New Brunswick, studying Native North Americans in the British Navy and Merchant service from 1700-1776. For this project, she researched, wrote for the website, and organized various meetings and events.

Photo of Sharon Leighton

Sharon Leighton is an MA student at the University of New Brunswick, where she is studying history. She contributed to project research and proofread document transcriptions for this digital collection.

Photo of Karen Stote

Karen Stote is a PhD student in the Interdisciplinary Studies Program at the University of New Brunswick. Her work focuses on the sterilization of Aboriginal women in Canada. She contributed to project research, metadata creation, and text encoding.

Photo of Martha Walls

Martha Walls received her PhD from the University of New Brunswick and has taught Canadian and First Nations history at UNB and St. Francis Xavier University. Her research is focused on twentieth century Canadian Indian policy and its impact on Maritime First Nations. Her publications include articles for the journals Acadiensis and the Canadian Journal of Native Studies and a monograph, No Need of a Chief for this Band: The Maritime Mi’kmaq and Federal Electoral Legislation, 1899-1951 (UBC, Spring 2010).

Instructional Design

Photo of Koral LaVorgna

Koral LaVorgna is a Ph.D. candidate in Canadian History at the University of New Brunswick, studying nineteenth-century New Brunswick teacher careerism. She works as a heritage consultant, researching Fredericton’s hidden history. For this project, she served as transcriber and proofread document transcriptions before designing the board game, Contested Terrain: Petition Edition.

Translation

Photo of Rebecca Colborne

Rebecca Colborne reviews, translates, and edits all text featured on French versions of Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives websites.

Photo of Mildred Miliea

Mildred Miliea provided a Mi'kmaq translation of the website introduction and her voice is heard reading the introduction in the accompanying audio clip. She is a member of Elsipogtog First Nation.

Photograph of Karen Perley

Karen Perley is a project executive with Archaeological Services, in the New Brunswick Department of Wellness, Culture and Sports. She provided a Maliseet translation of the website introduction and her voice is heard reading the introduction in the accompanying audio clip.

Digital Imaging

Photo of Duncan MacGillivray

Duncan MacGillivray is a student assistant at the Electronic Text Centre at the University of New Brunswick. He assists with document imaging and metadata creation.

Photo of Mike Meade

Mike Meade is the digital imaging coordinator with the Electronic Text Centre at the University of New Brunswick. He coordinates document scanning and collection of associated metadata for digital collections in the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives.

Graphic Design

Photo of Monica Currie

Monica Currie is a graphic designer with the Electronic Text Centre at the University of New Brunswick. She creates images and design elements for the website and promotional material for collections in the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives.

Web Development

Photo of Angus Fletcher

Angus Fletcher is a developer with the Electronic Text Centre at the University of New Brunswick. He assists the development and maintenance of digital collections in the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives.

Jason Nugent is a systems analyst with the Electronic Text Centre at the University of New Brunswick. He provides support and systems maintenance for the servers powering the Atlantic Canada Portal and Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives.

Photo of Jen Whitney

Jen Whitney is a developer with the Electronic Text Centre at the University of New Brunswick. She organizes contributions from transcribers, encoders, researchers, photographers, and graphic artists into digital collections for the Atlantic Canada Virtual Archives.